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Question Number: 28884

Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct 10/21/2014

RE: public school team Under 14

greg tracy of goffstown, nh usa asks...

if a player is alone on the field ( no player within 10 yds. or more) and he high kicks to trap the ball is it a dangerous play infraction?

Answer provided by Referee Jason Wright

Hi Greg,

There's no such offence under the laws as 'high foot'. This is covered by 'Playing in a Dangerous Manner (PIADM)', which is why a raised foot in close proximity to an opponent is often penalised (there are other things covered by this law as well).

PIADM can cover scenarios where the player puts an opponent in danger, or where they put themselves at risk (such as, crouching to head the ball that's approaching an opponent's foot) - but there must be an opponent involved.

Nobody around, nobody's in danger. So no foul.



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Answer provided by Referee Gene Nagy

Greg,

It is the referee, who decides whether a player has played in a dangerous manner. Whether you endanger a player by having you foot too high or whether you endanger yourself by heading the ball too low, near the feet of other players, is all how the ref judges the play. Well, it is impossible to endanger someone with a high kick if the other person is 10 yards away.
I suspect this is what happened in a U14 game and you cannot figure out how it could happen. Perhaps it was much less than 10 yards and perhaps the two players were approaching each other at a fast pace. Otherwise, nope, it cannot be Dangerous Play.



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Answer provided by Referee Joe McHugh

Hi Greg
The action must pose a danger to another player for it to be called playing in a dangerous manner which has an indirect free kick restart. If the closest player is 10 yards away then there is no offence for a player to raise his boot to control the ball.



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Answer provided by Referee

In matches played under the rules National Federation of High School (NFHS), a foul can occur if the action is likely to cause injury to any player, including injury to self. Rule 12.6. But, there is no foul if there is no one within playing distance. Play Ruling 12.6, Situation B.

Note: NFHS rules do not require that the action affect an opponent, as required in matches governed by the laws of the game.




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