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Question Number: 29682

Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct 9/11/2015

RE: rec Adult

Steve Percival of Market Harborough, Leicestershire England asks...

So the opposition have a corner. One defender on the post picks up the goalkeepers bottle to have a sip. Corner comes in, header past the keeper on target, said defender swings at the ball with the bottle and ball goes up in the air, to which the goalkeeper gets up and collects. Referee's decision was an indirect freekick and a yellow card, was this correct? The attacking team certainly didn't think so! (This happened previously, always wondered what the correct decision was, have only just discovered the site and would be great to find our!)

Answer provided by Referee James Sowa

Steve,

It sounds like you have the denial of an obvious goal scoring opportunity by handling. If the ball was truly headed into the net, then the actions by the defender prevented a goal. The water bottle is treated as an extension of the hand. Anything the bottle touches is viewed as being touched by that players hand (even if he had thrown the bottle!) That said, the player would be guilty of deliberate handling. Since that handling denied a goal scoring opportunity (or goal in this case), the player must be sent off and shown the red card. Handling is a direct free kick foul and, since it occurred in the penalty area, the restart should be a PK.

So short answer, Red card and Penalty Kick. The better question is why the referee allowed the corner kick to occur while one of the players clearly had something in his hand which could enable the above scenario. If he had waited a couple of seconds then the above does not occur.



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Answer provided by Referee Dennis Wickham

When a player grabs or throws something (stick, water bottle, rock, shoe) and uses it to touch the ball, this is considered an extension of the arm, and, thus, deliberate handling of the ball. The restart is a penalty kick.

The player would be sent off and shown the red card if the referee judges the act denied an obvious goal scoring opportunity, or a caution and yellow card if not the denial of an obvious goal scoring opportunity.



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Answer provided by Referee Joe McHugh

Hi Steve
Anything in the hand or thrown by the hand is an extension of the hand so in this instance it was deliberate handling which should have been a penalty kick.
As the ball was destined for the goal then clearly the action denied an obvious goal which is a sending off offence.
I would also point out that an indirect free kick offences also qualifies for a dismissal for denying an obvious goal or goal scoring opportunity.



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Answer provided by Referee Richard Dawson

Hi Steve,
welcome to the site, glad you managed to find us!
The situation you described could only result in an INDFK if it was the KEEPER who was handling the water bottle. A keeper cannot be guilty of a DFK because the bottle is consider as an extension of the hands and within his OWN PA the keeper is permitted the use of his hands except for 4 INDFK offences (1)2nd touch (2)handles a teammate deliberate kick (3)handles a team mates direct throw in or (4)holds onto the ball for more than 6 seconds . IF it was the keeper, he would be cautioned for USB shown a yellow card and an INDFK taken from where it occurred subject to the special circumstances in the goal area

Based on your telling of the event it appears a defender holding the water bottle inside the goal area was guilty of handling the ball deliberately which under the LOTG is a PK/dfk . As we have mentioned the holding or throwing of an object is considered as an extension of the hand if it hits the ball. The fact the contact occurs inside the PA makes it a PK. If the contact were to occur outside the PA it is a DFK only.

You also say the corner kick was on target, which implies the ball would or could have entered under the crossbar, between the goal posts, completely crossing the goal line for a goal. If this is true then the act is not an act of USB a caution show a yellow card but a DOGSO! A denial of an obvious goal scoring opportunity by the illegal use of the hands, we show red card, send off the player, reducing his team to ten

Cheers



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