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Question Number: 31718

Law 13 - Free Kicks 8/18/2017

RE: Grade 8 Under 10

Paul Burch of New Hartford, Connecticut USA asks...

With the recent small sided game initiative for youth soccer, in particular the IFK for a header, where is the ball spotted if the header by the defending team is within the goal area or penalty area? The USYSA states 'or on goal area line if infraction in the goal area.' So if a defender intentionally heads a ball in the 6 yd box, the ball is spotted where?

Answer provided by Referee Joe McHugh

Hi Paul
The Laws allow for any defensive free kick inside the goal area to to be spotted anywhere in the area. Most players chose the 6 yard goal area line.
If is is an attacking free kick it must be taken on the line as per the quote by Referee Grove. So the answer to your question is the six yard line. If you think about it the inbound IDFK could not be anywhere else other than the 6 yard line.
Imagine trying to spot an IDFK for a header off the goal line at the point of the offence? So it must come out to the 6 yard line in every instance.
If insiđe the penalty area the IDFK is taken by either side from where the offence occurred.




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Answer provided by Referee Peter Grove

Hi Paul,
USYSA operates according to the IFAB Laws of the Game (with modifications for younger players and small-sided games) so the following would apply: ''indirect free kicks to the attacking team for an offence inside the opponents' goal area are taken from the nearest point on the goal area line which runs parallel to the goal line''

The USYSA site also has the following wording related to heading offences (committed by the defending team) and which uses the same principle:

''If the deliberate header occurs within the goal area, the indirect free kick should be taken on
the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the nearest point to where the infringement
occurred.''

An indirect freekick to the attacking team in the opponent's penalty area but outside the goal area should be taken from where the offence occurred.



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Answer provided by Referee MrRef

I tried to research this but was met with a few discrepancies on local policies ? the normal appears to be if it is an INDFK inside the goal area off say a deliberate header by the defending team it is brought straight back to the goal area line that parallel the goal line .

IF they resize the goal area then there is less than 6 maybe a 5 yard distance of a INDFK inside the goal area instead of FIFA 6 yards but that also goes against the 8 yard minimum suggested in American youth soccer association for PK DFK .

Personally I think the attacking INDFK inside the goal area or PA should go all the way back to the outer edge of the PA and eliminate the idiotic standing on the goal line waiting to get a ball smashed into their faces if heading is such an issue!

I also believe if the ball is bouncing at head high a gentle nudge down to control is suitable and not dangerous so perhaps allowing a bouncing ball as an exception? I am rather curious if a ball is struck at head height do they have to duck? Can you place your arms on your head to protect it with impunity? On a high lobbed ball I assume it could be chested or trapped with thigh if the youth player is undaunted by the height. Not denigrating safety I am no neurosurgeon but if an outright ban really is the only option why not reduce the risk and move the ball farther away to allow for some reaction time?


USYSA . HEADING THE BALL

1. Consistent with the U.S. Soccer mandates on heading the ball, heading is banned for all division players U-11 (U-12 and below for programs without single age divisions) and below in both practices and games.

Heading for players in U-14 is limited to a maximum of thirty (30) minutes per week with no more than 15-20 headers, per player. There is no restriction on heading in matches.

2. An indirect free kick will be awarded to the opposing team if a player age 10 or younger, deliberately touches the ball with his/her head during a game.

a. The indirect free kick is to be taken from the place where the player touched the ball with his/her head.

b. An indirect free kick awarded to the attacking team inside the opposing team's goal area, must be taken on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the player touched the ball with his/her head.

3.Neither cautions nor send offs shall be issued for persistent infringement or denying an obvious goal scoring opportunity related to the heading infraction.


Note: The policy may be put into effect with the beginning of the next game circuit start. If your program is in the middle of league or tournament play, the switch to the new rule right may be delayed until the next gaming circuit start.

For more information on this policy, visit AYSO's National Rules and Regulations, Section I.I

AYSA guidelines do not specifically state the INDFK status of inside the goal area or PA but do state 8 yds as distance??

Length: minimum 45 yards maximum 60 yards
Width: minimum 35 yards maximum 45 yards
Field Markings: Distinctive lines not more than five (5) inches wide. The field of play is divided into two halves by a halfway line. The center mark is indicated at the midpoint of the halfway line. A circle with a radius of eight (8) yards is marked around it.
The Goal Area: A goal area is defined at each end of the field as follows: Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line five (5) yards from the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend into the field of play for a distance of five (5) yards and are joined by a line drawn parallel with the goal line. The area bounded by these lines and the goal line is the goal area.
The Penalty Area: A penalty area is defined at each end of the field as follows: Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line, ten (10) yards from the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend into the field of play for a distance of ten (10) yards and are joined by a line drawn parallel with the goal line. The area bounded by these lines and the goal line is the penalty area. Within each penalty area a penalty mark is made eight (8) yards from the midpoint between the goalposts and equidistant to them. An arc of a circle with a radius of eight (8) yards from each penalty mark is drawn outside the penalty area.
Law 8 – The Start and Restart of Play: Conform to FIFA with the exception of the opponents of the team taking the kick-off are at least eight (8) yards from the ball until it is in play.
Law 13 – Free Kicks: Conform to FIFA with the exception that all opponents are at least eight (8) yards from the ball.

from our pitch to your pitch in the spirit of fair play



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