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Question Number: 32815

High School 10/19/2018

RE: High School

Tony of SANDWICH, Massachusetts USA asks...

Even though a high school soccer goalie has six seconds to get rid of the ball out of his hands, is he not allowed to drop the ball on the ground inside his penalty area and pick up the ball, even if it occurs within six seconds?

Answer provided by Referee Joe McHugh

Hi Tony
No that is not possible.
Once the goalkeeper has the ball in his control he may not touch it again with his hands after he has released it to the ground even if it happens within six seconds.
The six seconds is the time the goalkeeper has to release the ball from his control.
Refer Rule 12 Section 7 Art 1 Quote
**From the moment the goalkeeper takes control of the ball with the hands when playing as a goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area, he/she has six seconds in which to release the ball into play.
During that interval, he/she may hold the ball, bounce it, or throw it into the air and catch it. Once the ball has been released into play, the goalkeeper may not touch it again with the hands until it has been played or touched by another player of the same team outside of the penalty area, or by a player of the opposing team either inside or outside of the penalty area.**
FIFA has the same ruling with the exception that a defender can play the ball inside or outside the penalty area like an attacker.
Anyway if the six seconds was ultra strictly enforced I doubt there would be time to control the ball, drop it and then pick it up again all within six seconds. It is possible to bounce the ball in the time allowed.





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Answer provided by Referee Richard Dawson


HI Tony,
the 6 seconds was supposed to be enough time for a keeper to get out to the top of the PA and punt or throw it down field for distribution within the LOTG . This INDFK punishment for releasing then retouching the ball with the hands if no other player had yet played the ball was so the oppositions efforts to play that ball could not be withheld longer than the initial 6 seconds of the release .

Now you say drop the ball as opposed to release so let take it a bit slow here. The keeper could mishandle a slippery ball and lose control of it momentarily. A keeper is allowed to BOUNCE the ball and there is nothing in the LOTG that state how that bounce must occur . We use 6 seconds but often we stretch that giving time for a keeper to perhaps dust themselves off per say after going to ground before we start expecting they NOW need to be releasing the ball.

If the keeper is doing a toss up or just drops as it slips out his hand bounces and he picks it up there are hardliners taken THAT was a release and thus as a 2nd touch it MUST be an INDFK. Same as bouncing and it catches his toe or a bit of uneven ground and rolls off. Technically if there was a nearby opponent who was not interfering up until that point that ball would be available to play even as an accidental release. No part of the LOTG state the keeper must release the ball on purpose only that he was under the gun to do so.

This bouncing thing for me is the a dumb part of this law because it is far easier to say if the ball contacts the ground it has been released after it has been handled. Now we can have some inventive bouncing two handed, basket ball style and this idea behind was it released or a slip is not a consideration. Ball on the ground = free play

For me this is a technical issue and there is leeway for doubtful or trifling conditions. Where a keeper perhaps setting the ball down to tie a shoe and then picks it up while technically he has released & re-picked it up if no opponent was near and this was done quickly I might choose to ignore it even if I warn but once the ball is on the roll along the ground or stationary be it accidentally dropped, the opposition cannot be faulted for challenging.
No opponents in the mix we might permit the reacquisition & punt out but again I suspect a referee in a wee one match or youth or adult rec would be inclined to be a bit more forgiving then the higher competitive leagues for an accidental slip or drop pick up as in any match his decision his reputation

Cheers



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Answer provided by Referee Joe Manjone

Tony,
This is verbatim from high school rule, 12-7-1:

'From the moment the goalkeeper takes control of the ball with the hands when playing as goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area, he/she has six seconds to release the ball into play. During that interval, he/she may hold the ball, bounce it or throw it into the air and catch it. Once the ball has been released into play, the goalkeeper my not touch it again with the hands until it has been played or touched by another player of the same team outside the penalty area or by a player of the opposing team either inside or outside the penalty area.'

Also high school rule 12-7-2 states:

'A goalkeeper shall not deliberately parry the ball and then touch it again with his/her hands before it has been played or touched by another player of the same team outside of the penalty area, or by a player of the opposing team either inside or outside the penalty area.'

Parrying is defined as: 'The deliberate attempt by the goalkeeper to control and/or deflect the ball down or out with the arms or hands.'

What you describe is considered releasing the ball into play and then touching it which would result in an indirect kick for the opponents from the spot of the violation unless the spot is within the goal area.

I hope that your Sandwich High School boys team is successful in your 3 remaining games, and also in the MIAA playoffs.



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